I Am Head Of Household


In spite of the fact, We are all Kings in our Castle the Internal Revenue Service looks at Head of Household differently.

When filing your taxes you are allowed the Filing Status of Head of Household under certain conditions.

First, you must be unmarried at the end of the year.and paid more than half the cost of maintaining your home (rent, mortgage, utilities, etc.) and support a qualifing person.

A qualifying person is a child, parent, or relative who meets certain conditions.

A qualifying child would be:

  • Your child (including legally adopted), stepchild, foster child, sibling, half-sibling, step-sibling, or a descendant of any of them (for example, your grandchild or niece) AND

  • Permanently and totally disabled OR under the age of 19 as of December 31, 2014 (under 24 if a full-time student) and younger than you (or your spouse, if filing jointly) AND

  • Lived with you for more than half the year AND

  • Single (or if the child is married, you'd have to qualify to claim them as a dependent even if you're not going to claim them as such).

A child that is too old to fit the definition of qualifying child may qualify as a relative. A qualifying relative would be:

  • Your mother or father, if you're qualified to claim them as a dependent (even if you're not claiming them as such) OR

  • A relative related by blood, legal adoption, or marriage other than a parent (child, sibling, grandparent, nephew, aunt, step-parent, in-law, etc.) AND lived with you for more than half the year AND that you're able to claim as a dependent (even if you're not claiming them as such).

If you're married and a child lives with you, you can qualify for Head of Household under a slightly different set of rules. As a married person, you won't be able to claim Head of Household if your dependent is somebody other than a child.

If you qualify based on the above information then you may claim Head of Household, which is a lower tax bracket that saves you money.

Featured Posts
Recent Posts